Plants Database – Garden.org


By ILPARW on Apr 17, 2020 8:49 AM, concerning plant: Chinese Redbud (Cercis chinensis)

My favoured part of horticulture is the newer naturalistic, native plants landscapes of eastern North America. However, I was trained in conventional ornamental horticulture and I could not pass up taking some shots of this good specimen of a Chinese Redbud in bloom. It is a very infrequently found woody plant used in the eastern USA that most people don’t know anything about. A few larger, diverse nurseries or mail order nurseries that sell rare or uncommon plants sell some. Unlike the popular Eastern Redbud, it is not a tree but a really large shrub that can be considered as a tree-shrub like a Pussy Willow. It is a good-looking plant. It eventually sends up lots of closely spaced erect stems and does often get about 15 feet high or a little more.

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By sallyg on Apr 16, 2020 8:47 PM, concerning plant: Cucumber (Cucumis sativus ‘Boston Pickling’)

This variety has grown well for me in Maryland and I really like the pickling type for taste.

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By ERROR1755 on Apr 16, 2020 6:43 PM, concerning plant: Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima ‘Dwarf Rainbow Mix’)

Sprouts in 8-10 days and grows very quickly. Perfect variety for tiny containers – I am current growing some in a plastic shot glass.

For best results, surface sow indoors about five weeks before the last frost for your area. Alternatively, you can directly sow outside once danger of frost has passed.

In my experience, it is slow to develop roots, so be very careful with where you plant it. I’ve knocked my seedlings over a few times just by gently watering them.

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By altonwmsjr on Apr 16, 2020 8:34 AM, concerning plant: Woolly Paw Paw (Asimina speciosa)

Woolly Paw Paws are setting fruit in zone 8, April 16, 2020.

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By jeffa on Apr 14, 2020 9:27 PM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris ‘Visiting Royalty’)

Some of the photos look like they may actually be Wild Wings – Tall Bearded Iris (Iris ‘Wild Wings’) – I believe that Visiting Royalty has a more maroon / reddish tint, and darker style arms… and Wild Wings is more purple. I have both, and will try to post accurate pictures of each over the next few years. Jeff, April 2020.

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By Baja_Costero on Apr 12, 2020 8:02 PM, concerning plant: Aeonium ‘Pseudotabuliforme’

Low, branching green Aeonium with attractive flat rosettes and yellow flowers. Despite the name, this cultivar is probably not related to A. tabuliforme (but it also has a similar range of alternate spellings). Both plants have flat, green rosettes but this cultivar grows a substantial stem (unlike tabuliforme) and it branches freely (unlike tabuliforme). Its parentage is not clear.

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By Damar on Apr 12, 2020 6:54 AM, concerning plant: Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia alata ‘Blushing Susie’)

I have had good success starting from seeds of blushing susie variety. 7 seeds out of 10, could be more if I was more careful moving them out of their tray. Start seeds indoors in early spring as follows:

Start in tray, space about 1″ apart.

Starter mix: 8 part coco coir + 1 part perlite. Mix should feel springy when slightly damp. Bottom watering just until you see the surface start to darken but you can’t see the water.

Mine sprout as early as 4 days.

When you see the leaves, transfer to 2″ cell. Use plastic dessert spoon to scoop out new sprout. Use same mix added with 0.5 part vermiculite + 1 part worm casting. Always water from the bottom. Expose to sunlight whenever there’s any; otherwise, put under grow light for about 12 hours a day.

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By LmcK on Apr 11, 2020 7:25 PM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Lion Heart’)

Can grow 6 ft. to 14 ft. If protected, support. Good producer. Pacific Northwest. Washington state.

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By ILPARW on Apr 10, 2020 10:05 AM, concerning plant: Possumhaw Viburnum (Viburnum nudum Brandywine™)

I have not seen this newer cultivar yet. This cultivar is a compact form growing about 5 to 6 feet high and wide and it is noted for its large, prolific display of vibrant pink and blue berries (drupes), plus good red fall color. It is self-fertile and does not need another cultivar or the mother species around to bloom well. Still, it is often recommended with the ‘Winterthur’ cultivar. It was introduced into the trade by Mark Bulk of Boskoop, Netherlands. This is an eastern North American species that has found favour in the landscapes of Europe and this cultivar was selected there.

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By Baja_Costero on Apr 9, 2020 10:19 AM, concerning plant: White Cloud (Echeveria cante)

Solitary bluish white mountain Echeveria from north-central Mexico, prized for its intensely farinose leaves. Older plants may eventually offset. Leaf margins are pinkish or reddish, and leaf tips are acute. Inflorescences have about 5 branches and glaucous orange-pink flowers. From Zacatecas.

This plant was for many years known in cultivation as E. subrigida, but it comes from a geographically distinct location, and was described as a species in 1997. Its leaves are more farinose, less channeled, and less succulent. It has been used intensively in breeding and is a parent of at least a dozen named hybrids, including the very popular “Afterglow”.

Given good care in cultivation, this species can grow relatively large for the genus, up to about 12-16 inches wide. Mature plants can be spectacular.

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