Family told ‘dominant’ garden decking may have to be torn down

The garden decking at this house in Wales may have to be torn down. (Wales News Service)

A family may have to tear down their “dominant” garden decking because it towers 16ft over the street below.

Jamie Davies, 38, installed a 44ft long stretch of decking on a steel frame in his garden in Blaina, Wales, but failed to apply for planning permission.

The decking covers the sloping side of the garden at his detached home.

He first applied unsuccessfully for retrospective planning permission for the £6,000 decking two years ago, but was refused.

And now the local council looks set to stand by its decision after Mr Davies submitted another bid for retrospective planning permission.

Davies, a manager of a sports centre, said the decking had been put up to give “privacy for the children while they play”.

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A family has lost a battle to keep Britain's ugliest garden decking - because it towers 16ft over the street below.

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, put up the 44ft long decking on a huge steel frame in a bid to give his family privacy in their garden.

But he failed to apply for planning permission for the super-deck covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden.

Jamie has now lost an appeal for retrospective planning permission after council planners said it was “an unduly dominant feature.

The decking sits high above the street in Blaina, Wales. (Wales News Service)

But Blaenau Gwent County Borough Council was told it was “an unduly dominant feature” by its planning officer, Joanne White.

She said: “The application is not significantly different to that previously refused by planning committee and the planning inspector.

“The decking to be retained sits along the rear side boundary, fronting the road.

“The dwelling occupies a corner plot within the estate commonly known as ‘Tanglewood’ in Blaina.

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A family has lost a battle to keep Britain's ugliest garden decking - because it towers 16ft over the street below.

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, put up the 44ft long decking on a huge steel frame in a bid to give his family privacy in their garden.

But he failed to apply for planning permission for the super-deck covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden.

Jamie has now lost an appeal for retrospective planning permission after council planners said it was Òan unduly dominant feature.

How the property looked before the decking was erected. (Wales News Service)

“The topography is such that Tanglewood Drive rises steeply from west to east. Thus, the adjacent property at Tanglewood Drive is at a significantly lower level than the application site property.”

Ms White advised that planning permission should be refused as it would be “an unduly dominant feature” that has an adverse visual “impact upon the street scene.”

A family has lost a battle to keep Britain's ugliest garden decking - because it towers 16ft over the street below.

Homeowner Jamie Davies, 38, put up the 44ft long decking on a huge steel frame in a bid to give his family privacy in their garden.

But he failed to apply for planning permission for the super-deck covering the sloping side of his modern detached garden.

Jamie has now lost an appeal for retrospective planning permission after council planners said it was “an unduly dominant feature.

The decking cost £6,000 to install but has so far failed to receive planning permission. (Wales News Service)

She said there are “other ways” to increase the usable space of the garden.

She added: “I do not consider this is a reason in which to allow an unacceptable development.”

The council will discuss the plans at a future meeting.