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Indoor composter turns kitchen scraps into fertilizer

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a woman standing in front of a box: Rubbermaid’s program addresses a gap left by recycling facilities that don’t take food-grade material.


© Provided by Ottawa Citizen
Rubbermaid’s program addresses a gap left by recycling facilities that don’t take food-grade material.

I know, I know, I know: This is the third time in the last 18 months I’ve written about reducing or redirecting kitchen waste.

Humour me please, because as an enthusiast home cook I’m evangelical on the topic. Righteously so, I think, given that the 2.2 million tonnes of avoidable household food waste created annually by Canadians is equivalent to 2.1 million cars on the road, according to Love Food Hate Waste Canada , an awareness campaign delivered by the National Zero Waste Council.

Love Food Hate Waste Canada has great tips for reducing food waste. But even the most careful cooks will have scraps. The good news is that products, programs and processes that lessen kitchen waste are coming to market.



a person standing in front of a stove:  The FoodCycler reduces the volume of kitchen food waste by up to 90 per cent.


© Supplied
The FoodCycler reduces the volume of kitchen

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Five ways to turn fallen leaves into free fertilizer for your garden

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Leaves can become a natural renewable resource that creates the perfect soil to grow new vegetation.

Leaf litter is a common sight in yards across the country this time of year. Instead of raking leaves into bags headed for the landfill, experts say fallen leaves can stay put, and with a little preparation, become a natural renewable resource that creates the perfect soil to grow new vegetation.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, yard wastes account for approximately 20 percent of all garbage generated in the United States each year.

The EPA’s most recent statistics indicate 34.5 million tons of yard trimmings were accounted for in 2014, but only about 31 percent (10.8 million tons) ended up in a landfill.

Most tree leaves, grass clippings, brush and other prunings end up recycled, composted or burned for energy. And experts, like horticulturist Robert “Skip” Richter with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

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