0

The top Republican in the House is trying to rewrite history on the January 6 Capitol riot

Posted on

Asked specifically by Wallace whether former President Donald Trump had, as CNN has reported, told him in a phone call that the rioters cared more about the 2020 election than he did, McCarthy side-stepped, offering this:

“What I talked to President Trump about, I was the first person to contact him when the riots was going on. He didn’t see it. What he ended the call was saying — telling me, he’ll put something out to make sure to stop this. And that’s what he did, he put a video out later.”

Which is, uh, not exactly what happened. Here’s what did happen, via reporting in February from CNN’s Jamie Gangel, Kevin Liptak, Michael Warren and Marshall Cohen:

“Speaking to the President from inside the besieged Capitol, McCarthy pressed Trump to call off his supporters and engaged in a heated disagreement about who comprised the crowd. Trump’s comment about the Read More

0

President Trump’s Rose Garden Event ‘Biggest Breach Of National Security In The History Of The Country’

Posted on

BOSTON (CBS) – Boston Mayor Marty Walsh called the White House’s Rose Garden event for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett “probably the biggest breach of national security in the history of our country.”

On September 26, President Trump held an outdoor ceremony at the Rose Garden, which was attended by about 200 people — many of whom were not wearing masks or following social distancing guidelines. There are also photos of some of the attendees inside the White House on Saturday.

“If you gather at a party of 25 people or more, there’s a chance that somebody is a carrier COVID, and all of a sudden now we have a super spreader event,” Walsh said. “We saw this at the White House last week. We saw about 100 people sitting on, I think it was the South Lawn or the Rose Garden. Nobody was wearing a mask. Nobody

Read More

0

Ugly Story From American History, Inspiring Stories Of Art, On View At Shofuso Japanese House And Garden

Posted on

The Underground Railroad will always serve as America’s greatest example of ordinary citizens sticking their necks out to help those suffering under the crushing weight of the nation’s racist institutions. Another example can currently be found in a most unusual place, the Shofuso Japanese House and Garden in Philadelphia during its new exhibition, “Shofuso and Modernism: Mid-Century Collaboration between Japan and Philadelphia.”

Organized by The Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia (JASGP) with support from The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, the exhibition celebrates the friendships and transcultural exchanges between Junzo Yoshimura (1908–1997, Japan), George Nakashima (1905-1990, US), Noémi Pernessin Raymond (1889-1980, France) and Antonin Raymond (1888–1976, Austria-Hungary), through their collaborative architectural projects.

Their brilliant artwork takes on added dimensions when their

Read More

0

History of The Department of the Interior

Posted on

In 1789 Congress created three Executive Departments: Foreign Affairs (later in the same year renamed State), Treasury, and War. It also provided for an Attorney General and a Postmaster General. Domestic matters were apportioned by Congress among these departments.

Patent Office Building
The first Interior Building, 1852 -1917. The Patent Office building, today housing the Smithsonian Institution’s Portrait Gallery and the National Museum of American Art, served as DOI headquarters. Photo circa 1890, Library of Congress.

Why was the U.S. Department of the Interior Created?

The idea of setting up a separate department to handle domestic matters was put forward on numerous occasions. It wasn’t until March 3, 1849, the last day of the 30th Congress, that a bill was passed to create the Department of the Interior to take charge of the Nation’s internal affairs:

The Department of Everything Else: Highlights of Interior History.

The Interior Department had a wide range of

Read More

0

State of the Union | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives

Posted on

Woodrow Wilson Addresses Congress/tiles/non-collection/w/wilson_addressing_congress_lc_web.xml
Image courtesy of Library of Congress
On December 13, 1913, Woodrow Wilson gave the first in-person Annual Message since the 18th century.

Including President Donald J. Trump’s 2020 address, there have been a total of 97 in-person Annual Messages/State of the Union Addresses. Since President Woodrow Wilson’s 1913 address, there have been a total of 85 in-person addresses.

In 1945, President Franklin Roosevelt’s address was read to a Joint Session of the House and Senate. Since the President did not deliver the address, it does not count as an in-person address.

Origins and Authorization

The formal basis for the State of the Union Address is from the U.S. Constitution:

  • The President “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he
    shall judge necessary and expedient.” Article II, Section 3, Clause 1.

The constitutionally

Read More

0

The History of the Bathroom, revisited

Posted on

Almost every book you read on the history of the toilet talks about, well, the toilet. In fact, the actual object is almost trivial; otherwise everyone would have one instead of one third of the world going without. The problem is what it is connected to, both its input and its output. In honor of World Toilet Day, here is a history of the toilet in its milieu, the bathroom.

john hunt waste image

The History of the Bathroom Part 1: Before the Flush

Victor Hugo wrote in Les Miserables that “the history of men is reflected in the history of sewers.”… The sewer is the conscience of the city. Everything there converges and confronts everything else. ” It has not changed much since Victor Hugo’s day. More in TreeHugger

london sewers photo

The History of the Bathroom Part 2: Awash In Water and Waste

In 1854 there was a major outbreak of cholera in Soho, London.

Read More

0

A Brief History of the Bathroom

Posted on

The privacy, comfort, luxury and extreme sanitary conditions that we associate with our bathrooms today are the result of thousands of years of civil engineering and social change. Indoor plumbing, flushing toilets, heated water, water pressure, electricity and ventilation may be features we take for granted in our modern bathroom. But all of our bathroom’s high tech gadgets had a long history in the making. Although humans have always had the need to use toilet facilities and have used bathing as a way to cleanse themselves, it took centuries for our culture to bring these two important functions together into one convenient room. Let’s explore the fascinating history of the bathroom and see how much, or how little, has changed.

Ancient Societies and Public Bathing

When we talk about the activities we perform in our bathrooms today, we tend to speak of everything that relates to taking care of our

Read More

0

ArchitectureWeek – Culture – The History of Interior Design

Posted on


The History of Interior Design

by John Pile

In the modern world, human life experience is largely played out in interior spaces. We may love the out-of-doors for the sense of open air and sky, for the escape it offers from life inside enclosure, but the very joy of being outside reflects the reality that so much of life is spent inside.

Buildings and their interiors are planned to serve the purposes and styles of the times of their origins, but they exert their influence on the activities and lives that they house as long as they continue in use.

The study of interior design, its development and change through history is a useful way both to explore the past and to make sense of the spaces in which modern life is lived.

Professional interior designers are expected to study design history, to know the practices of the past in

Read More

0

3 Ways to Research the History of Your House

Posted on

About This Article

Article SummaryX

To research the history of your house, look at its design and the materials used to build it, which can help date it. Go to your local courthouse or county recorder and find your property’s abstract. That will give you a complete history of when your house was built and purchased over the years. You can also search online or at a nearby historical society for property history records and other information about your house and neighborhood. For more tips on researching your house’s history, including looking at atlases, maps, and field books, read on!

  • Print
  • Send fan mail to authors
Thanks to all authors
Read More