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Living off the Land: Managing your garden after a killing frost | Living off the land

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Different parts of the Snake River Valley experienced a “damaging” but not killing frost a couple weeks ago. And if your garden was covered, then you probably have loads of green tomatoes, squash, and vegetables still ripening and growing.

Within the near future we will inevitably be having a killing frost, which will make most people’s gardens a thing of the past. After a killing frost you may be looking at the carnage in your garden and think that if we had just a couple more weeks, we could have gotten that produce ripened. (That’s always wishful thinking, but it never happens.)

For most people this was a slightly difficult growing season due to the intense heat we experienced during the summer and how much extra watering it took to keep plants growing, keep up with evaporation and not have them drought stressed. Also, many people started planting a garden

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Husband was arrested on suspicion of killing wife after she fell over in bathroom and hit her head

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A husband was arrested on suspicion of killing his wife in a domestic violence incident after she drunkenly fell over in their en-suite bathroom and hit her head, an inquest heard. 

Tracy Bailey and her husband Austin had been sleeping in separate bedrooms in the week before she died, after they got into a ‘petty argument’ which was blown out of proportion, the inquest was told. 

When Mr Bailey awoke on September 10 last year he found his 44-year-old wife laying on her right side on their bathroom floor, with her head against the side of the shower tray and a clear head injury. 

In a statement to the inquest, Mr Bailey said: ‘I was distraught and did not want to believe that she was dead.’ 

Tracy Bailey (pictured) and her husband Austin had been sleeping in separate bedrooms in the week before she died, after they got into a

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LSU Garden News: Those tiny moths you see are producing webworms that are killing your lawn | Home/Garden

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Across the state, lawns are in trouble.

Sod webworms are the main culprit this year, said LSU AgCenter Extension specialist Ron Strahan.

“The numbers are biblical,” Strahan said. “We have observed nearly every house on a single street with damage in the lawn.”

The first sign that your lawn might have a problem are small moths that are light brown to dark brown with striping on the wings. They fly around as you walk through the grass or around outdoor lights at night. These moths lay eggs on grass blades.

Larvae hatch a week or so later, maturing into adult moths in three to five weeks. There can be two or more generations each year.

Larvae are amber in color but become greener as they feed on the blades of grass at night, causing damage to the lawn.

Another sign of sod webworms are yellowing and browning patches of dead

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